Total Dermatology

Acrylic Nails – A Top Skin Contact Allergen

 

Those pretty acrylic nails may contain the top contact allergen of 2012.

For years there’s been a battle about the ingredients in nail polish and for decades women have suffered from itchy eyes, mystery breakouts and skin eruptions because they were allergic to some of the nail polish compounds.

The New “Bad Girl”

The new “bad girl”  for some is artificial nails. Well, she’s not new, but she’s starting to get the attention she deserves! And it’s not positive.

AAD names Top Contact Allergen

At this year’s AAD (American Academy of Dermatology), the “award” for top contact allergen of 2012 goes to acrylates – and they’re everywhere! And they’re hard to “nail down”. But if you pay attention, and find that you have new itchy skin, inflammed fingertips or nail bed, then you might be able to point a finger at the culprit.

What To Do If Artificial Nails Are Causing Problems

IF you find your artificial nails are the bad girl, have them professionally removed at a salon that can do so without causing nail plate damage. Generally those who routinely use artificial nails have weakened natural nail structure and you’ll need to baby your way back to stronger natural nails. Biotin helps, as does the age old Knox gelatin.

 

Another resource, About.com, discusses artificial nails and other common cosmetic products that can induce a contact allergic response:

“Fingernail coatings. Reactions to acrylic coatings on fingernails are a common cause of contact dermatitis on the fingers, as well as on the face and eyelids. Many people who use cosmetics on their fingernails (artificial nails or coatings on natural nails) may touch their face and eyelids with their nails, often without realizing it. Common chemicals include acrylates and formaldehyde-based resins.

These chemicals are frequently used in professional nail salons, but can also be present in nail polish, especially those claiming to be nail strengtheners and containing top coats. Always check the ingredient list on the bottle before purchasing any nail polish or coating if you experience contact dermatitis to acrylates or formaldehyde resins.”

About.com article on contact allergans in cosmetic products

 

By |2018-11-16T06:24:53-07:00March 27th, 2012|Dermatology News|Comments Off on Acrylic Nails – A Top Skin Contact Allergen

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